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Judaism beliefs on interracial dating

In Haredi communities, marriages may be arranged by the parents of the prospective bride and groom, who may arrange a shidduch by engaging a professional match-maker ("shadchan") who finds and introduces the prospective bride and groom and receives a "brokerage-fee" for his or her services.

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If the husband and wife were both taken captive, the historic Jewish view was that the rabbinic courts should first pay the ransom for the wife, selling some of the husband's property in order to raise the funds.The rights of the husband and wife are described in tractate Ketubot in the Talmud, which explains how the rabbis balanced the two sets of rights of the wife and the husband.According to the non-traditional view, in the Bible the wife is treated as a possession owned by her husband, Biblical Hebrew has two words for "husband": ba'al (also meaning "master"), and ish (also meaning "man", parallel to isha meaning "woman" or "wife").Some rabbis have gone further to commend the age of eighteen as most ideal, while others have advocated for the time immediately following puberty, closer to the age of fourteen, essentially "as early in life as possible." Babylonian rabbis understood marriage as God's means of keeping male sexuality from going out of control, so they advocated for early marriage to prevent men from succumbing to temptation in their youth.Moreover, is problematic for an older man to be unmarried in the first place.After the reading, the mothers of the future bride and groom break a plate.

Today, some sign the contract on the day of the wedding, some do it as an earlier ceremony, and some do not do it at all.

The niddah laws are regarded as an intrinsic part of marital life (rather than just associated with women).

Together with a few other rules, including those about the ejaculation of semen, these are collectively termed "family purity".

After erusin, the laws of adultery apply, and the marriage cannot be dissolved without a religious divorce. Marriage obligations and rights in Judaism are ultimately based on those apparent in the Bible, which have been clarified, defined, and expanded on by many prominent rabbinic authorities throughout history.

Traditionally, the obligations of the husband include providing for his wife.

If either partner refuses to participate, that person is considered rebellious, and the other spouse can sue for divorce.